Sights


The Prefecture Building

Trg cara Urosa 1, Sombor
phone: 025/468-111
web: www.sombor.rs
work hours: 8:00-20:00 (with mandatory announcements of visits, contact: 025/434-350)

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City Museum

Trg Republike 4, Sombor
phone: 025/422-728
reservations: 025/22-728 (Sonja Petreš i Viktorija Lakatoš)
e-mail: gmso@ptt.rs, gmso@sbb.rs
web: www.gms.rs

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City Hall

Built on the foundations of the castle formerly owned by Count and Captain John Branković, nephew and rightful heir if Serbian despot, count Đorđa Branković, the City Hall represents the central architectural symbol of Sombor.

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The Holy Trinity Square

The Holy Trinity Square was named after the stone monument of the Holy Trinity, which was placed in 1774. The monument was placed in the central part of the square in gratitude for the ending of numerous outbreaks of plague at that time.

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St Archdeacon Stefan Monastery

Svetog Arhidjakona Stefana 2, Sombor
phone: 025/460-055

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Church of the Holy Trinity

On the ground of the church of an old church built in 1717. by Bunjevci ethnic group from Sombor, on ruins of old Turkish buildings, the construction of a new church was started in 1752. and lasted until 1763.

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THE CHURCH OF ST JOHN THE FORERUNNER (The Small Orthodox Church)

The basis of an ancient structure dating from the first half of the 16th century makes a foundation of the Church of St John the Forerunner. According to tradition, at the place of the Small Orthodox Church there had been an orthodox church originating back from the time before the Turks had come to Sombor in 1541. The Turks had turned the orthodox church into a mosque. After they had left the area it was turned it back into the church of St John the Forerunner. The old church was torn down in 1786. In 1790 the new Church of St John the Forerunner, built in baroque style with rococo elements was consecrated. The...

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THE CHURCH OF ST GEORGE THE MARTYR (The Great Orthodox Church)

Way back in Turkish times, Serbian people of Sombor, craftsmen and merchants had a small St George’s Church on the northeast side of the trench. They reconstructed it in 1717 and in 1744 they began building a new big church tower next to the old small church. Having earned the status of Free and Royal City for Sombor (1749), they wanted to have a church worthy of the privilege which had been acquired so hard. In 1759 they began building a new church with no help from the state nor the foreigners, but with hearty donations from both the rich and the poor orthodox Serbs of Sombor. The church was built in a combination...

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THE CARMELITE CHURCH

The construction of the new Roman Catholic Church in Sombor was proposed way back in 1826. It took longer than a quarter of a century before the building process started in 1860. The Church was built in neo-Renaissance style and dedicated to the Holy Hungarian King Stephen. It was consecrated in 1904. That same year, the construction of the Convent was completed, also in neo-Renaissance style, and in 1905 it was given to the order of Carmelites. Today, the Carmelite Convent, together with the Church of St Stephen the King, makes a unique architectural composition. There is an organ made in 1926 that was among the biggest in former Yugoslavia.

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GRASSALKOVICH PALACE

A spacious baroque one-storey building was built by noble Count Antun Grassalkovich, the manager of the imperial estates of the Bačka-Bodrog District. Building of the palace had been completed by 1763 at the latest. At first, the purpose of the palace was to accommodate the administration centre of the Bačka Chamber Head Office and as the immigration centre after that and a quarantine for German immigrants colonized in Bačka during the sixties and seventies of the 18th century. The present appearance of Grassalkovich Palace dates back from the end of the 19th century, when a part of the building was remodeled and added to the Palace.

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HISTORICAL ARCHIVES (PASHA’S TOWER AND KRUSCHPER’S HOUSE)

The only trace of the former Coborszentmihaly fortress dating from the pre-Turkish period and the last mark of a century and a half long Turkish stay in Sombor, the oldest building preserved in town with its present form originating from the end of the 16th or the beginning of the 17th century, is still called Pasha’s Tower or the Turkish Tower. The Turks probably did some remodeling and reconstructing on it after they had conquered Sombor in 1541. Today it is a part of the Historical Archives Building in Sombor.

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THE CHAPEL OF ST IVAN NEPOMUK

Built in 1751, a charming chapel in rococo style was dedicated to Saint Ivan Nepomuk, the guardian against floods. The shape of the Chapel led to an assumption that its foundation had originated from the former Turkish church that used to stand by Pasha’s Tower.

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KRONIĆ PALACE

An edifice of classical beauty in eclectic style was built in 1906 by dr Stevan Kronić, a landowner and a lawyer from Sombor. Since they had got themselves in financial troubles, the successors sold the Palace in 1938 to a pharmacist dr Djordje Antić, who „gave“ the Palace to the authorities after the War. Today, the Trade Court of Sombor is seated in the Palace.

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FRANCISCAN CLOISTER (The Parochial Palace)

There’s a building by the Church of Holy Trinity that used to be a Franciscan cloister. The building of the cloister began in 1743 and was completed in 1749. It was in the premises of the cloister that Sombor was proclaimed a Free and Royal City by the Charter of Maria Theresia on 24th April 1749. The Franciscans left both the Cloister and the city of Sombor obeying an order issued by Austrian Emperor Joseph II in 1786. That same year, Sombor became the permanent seat of Bačka-Bodrog District, so the parochial office and administration was moved to the Cloister building and had stayed in it until 1809, when...

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THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL

The Preparatory School building or The Teacher-Training School of Sombor, the legacy of Georgije Branković, Serbian Patriarch and Metropolitan of Karlovci, who also used to be a director of the School, as well as a priest in Sombor, was built in 1895 in neo-renaissance style. It was with his financial resources that the Preparatory School of Sombor was built, where teaching process for men’s classes of the School went on from 1895 until 1948. Today, the building houses the Museum of Sombor Teacher-Training School as well as a part of its rich old Library and the Dean’s Office of the Teacher-Training...

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THE SERBIAN READING ROOM

The Serbian Reading Room was established in 1845 on the initiative of 72 most educated and respected Serbs. It is placed in the building which was built in eclectic style in 1882. After he had got married to Julijana Palanački, Laza Kostić became a member of the Serbian Reading Room in 1897 and in 1901 he was elected the president of the Reading Room. He had performed this duty until his death in 1910. As a sign of respect toward its prominent president, the Serbian Reading Room had not elected a new president for the whole following year. Today, the Serbian Reading Room is the place where a large number of cultural events are held.

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SAINT GEORGE’S SQUARE

Saint George’s Square is located on the east side of the Town Hall. The square had its highest esthetic value in 1940 when the bronze horseman statue dedicated to King Aleksandar, the work of Antun Augustinčić, was placed there. The monument was removed after the Hungarians had arrived in 1941. The square was united in a unique esthetic entirety with the orthodox cross from 1795 which is now kept in the churchyard of Saint George’s Church. In the place of today’s department store there was a one-storey building In foro which was erected in 1804. In that period there was also the first artesian well in the square which was dug in 1887.

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